Join the Tactical Shooters Alliance

The core of the TSA is its members. Part of the reason the TSA was created was to give shooters the opportunity to gauge their ability compared to other shooters across the country who participate in our monthly matches and allow those shooters to communicate with each other about technique, equipment, firearms, and other topics surrounding the tactical shooting community. This is why, as members, your match scores Will be posted and ranked on our national database, allowing you to make a realistic assessment of your skill set and gear loadout. You will also be invited to the TSA's closed Facebook group, where you can participate in group discussions with the TSA headquarters and other members regarding tactics, equipment, firearms, technique, match information, etc. It is our goal to unite our members in a manner that allows their collective knowledge, skill set, and background to come together in a manner that benefits the entire community, whether you are a civilian, military, or law-enforcement. Join the TSA today, find a club or start one, and get involved in what you're passionate about!

Membership Packages Click on a package name for more info

1st Year-Affiliate Club 1 Year Membership

1st Year-Affiliate Club 1 Year Membership

Cost: $400.00
Next Event: None Scheduled

Bringing monthly TSA matches to your local gun club is an outstanding way to increase club revenue, engage new members, and re-engage your current members, and the TSA makes it easy. With your clubs first membership, the TSA can provide almost everything needed to host TSA matches at discounted prices, making it an affordable and cost effective addition to your clubs' monthly schedule.

What's included?
x2 Official TSA steel activator poppers
x100 Official TSA match targets
Official TSA Excel Spreadsheet Match Results Template

Optional Equipment:
Extra Official TSA targets
TSA steel target stands
TSA chamber flags
Magnet for checking for steel core ammo

Note: After the first year, your club will only be charged a renewal fee of $60.00 annually.

If your interested in bringing the TSA to your club please contact us and request a new club application.

Pre-requisites

  • Must meet range requirements for safety set forth by the Tactical Shooters Alliance.

No Upcoming Events Scheduled

Become a TSA Match Safety Officer

Become a TSA Match Safety Officer

Cost: $10.00
Next Event: None Scheduled

The TSA needs responsible, disciplined volunteers to help run matches in the safest way possible. The TSA requires that all Match Safety Officer Applicants pass a written test. Once the volunteer has applied, he/she will be mailed all necessary TSA MSO training material to successfully and safely act as an MSO and pass the written test.

Click the "Shop" link and then select the "Join Us" tab to apply.

Pre-requisites

  • Applicant Must meet at least one of the following:
  • -Current IDPA, USPCA, 3Gun, or IPSC safety officer.
  • -Current firearms instructor rating
  • -Participated in at least five competitive matches in the last year.
  • -Exceptions may be made for experience deemed equivalent by the TSA

No Upcoming Events Scheduled

Individual 1 year membership

Individual 1 year membership

Cost: $30.00
Next Event: None Scheduled

If your looking for an organization that gives you an outlet to apply your ability as a tactical shooter, compare your ability with others, and gives you the opportunity to educate and learn from your peers, you have to come the right place.

With your membership, you will be granted to have your match scores posted and ranked on our national match database. This means, that when you compete in your local TSA match, your results will be able to be compared against every other TSA member, and not just those who you are competing with at your local club. It is through this means of side by side comparison, that you can really see how you stack up, and where you need improvement the most, allowing you make an honest assessment of your skill set, your weapons, and your chosen equipment.

As a member, you will be invited to the TSA's closed Facebook group. It is here that our members can communicate with each other about the matches, techniques, equipment, firearms, new clubs, etc. It is through this community of diverse backgrounds that, as a member, you will benefit. You will have the opportunity to teach other members about skill sets you're strong in, and in turn, you will have the opportunity to learn from members who are strong in areas you are not.

To become a member, click the "Shop" tab, and then the "Join Us" tab. Add the 1 year individual membership to your shopping cart and proceed to checkout.

members will receive a white TSA identification card with their name and member ID#

No Upcoming Events Scheduled

Tactical Shooters Alliance Match

Tactical Shooters Alliance Match

Cost: $0.00
Next Event: None Scheduled

Our new shooting competition is hosted at Tri-county Coon Hunters in Batesville, IN. You will need a Semi-Automatic magazine fed rifle of .223 or higher caliber OR a Semi-Automatic magazine carbine of 9mm caliber or higher, and a sidearm of 9mm or higher. .22 cal. is OK but will not be scored against other shooters. You will need at MOST 100 rounds for each weapon, and at least 3 magazines and mag holders for both firearms. You will need a sling for your long gun. A copy of the rule book can be viewed on IronSight Tactical's personal and business facebook page, or it can be emailed in PDF format upon request. Sign in starts at 9:00 am at the rifle range lodge. Cost is 15.00 due at sign in. If you have any questions call Walt at 812.614.2252.

Topics Covered

  • 2016 Tactical Shooters Alliance (TSA) Rule Book
  • Presented by IronSight Tactical LLC
  • Founding Concepts of TSA
  • The TSA was created as a training outlet for recreational and defensive minded shooters. Unlike similar shooting sports, TSA was created as an attempt to create the most realistic and tactically sound shooting scenarios while employing the use of a primary and secondary weapon system. It requires participants to focus not only on completing a course of fire per instructions and under a timer, but to also find the balance of speed and efficiency, while utilizing two different weapons in compliment of each other under different gear loads and arrangements. The result of this method of competition allows participants to enhance their focus and problem solving ability in an environment that forces you to account for multiple variables, just as you would in the real world. Competition aside, it is our goal at TSA to make people better shooters. We are all students, and TSA is the outlet for us to share our collective knowledge about defensive shooting, tactics, and handling mechanics so that we may all benefit and advance our ability towards a common goal, to become better, disciplined shooters.
  • Contents
  • 1. Safety Rules
  • 2. Disqualifications
  • 3. Conduct
  • 4. Divisions, Classifications, and Sub-Classes
  • 5. Firearms, Ammunition, and Equipment
  • 6. Courses of Fire
  • 7. Targets, Steel, and Barriers
  • 8. Scoring and Penalties
  • 9. Range Commands
  • 10. Tactical Principals
  • 11. Stage Execution
  • 1.0 SAFETY RULES, DISQUALIFICATIONS, AND CONDUCT
  • 1.1 ALWAYS
  • TREAT EVERY WEAPON AS IF IT WERE LOADED
  • NEVER POINT A WEPAON AT ANYTHING YOU DO NOT INTEND TO DESTROY
  • KEEP YOUR FINGER OFF THE TRIGGER UNTIL READY TO FIRE
  • KEEP THE WEAPON ON SAFE UNTIL READY TO FIRE (if applicable)
  • 1.2 It is the competitor’s responsibility to read and understand the rules set forth by TSA and agree to be subject to these rules while participating in any TSA event.
  • 1.3 It is competitors’ responsibility to know, understand and adhere to all Federal, State and Local Regulations regarding the use and transportation of firearms. Including all applicable National Firearms Act (NFA) regulations related to the construction, transportation and use of any firearm regulated by NFA rules.
  • 1.4 All TSA Produced Events will be run on COLD RANGES.
  • COLD RANGE definition: Competitors' firearms must remain unloaded at the event site except under the direct supervision of an event official.
  • 1.5 Designated Safe Areas
  • Safe areas will be clearly marked with signs. This is the only place that firearms may be handled off the firing line for the purpose of maintenance and adjustment. Live ammunition may not be handled in safe areas.
  • 1.6 Transporting Rifle, Carbine, and Pistol (from vehicle or between stages)
  • Rifles and Carbines must be cased or if hand carried or slung, the muzzle must be pointed down with a safety flag inserted. Using carts where the muzzles are pointed downward are approved. Pistols carried between stages must be cased or remain holstered.
  • Rifles & Carbines must be transported with actions open, detachable magazines removed, with an inserted chamber safety flag. Actions can only be "closed" on an inserted chamber safety flag.
  • While on the range and not on the firing line handguns must remain holstered and all long guns must be slung muzzle down or placed on the safe table muzzle away from range, with a safety flag inserted at all times. All safe tables must be marked to clearly designate what direction the muzzle should be oriented.
  • During a course of fire a competitor may handle more than one firearm at a time, however neither firearm may be discharged until one is re-holstered or safely grounded or slung. Violation of this rule will result in a match DQ. All safety rules apply while handling two firearms at the same time.
  • 2.0 DISQUALIFICATIONS
  • 2.1 Disqualifications are made at the discretion of the Match Director only.
  • 2.2 A Disqualification (DQ) will result in complete disqualification from the event and the competitor will not be allowed to continue.
  • 2.3 Safety violations will not be subject to arbitration.
  • 2.4 A Range Officer must stop a competitor who causes a negligent discharge as soon as possible.
  • 2.5 Disqualification for a Negligent Discharge, this includes slam-fires.
  • Definitions of Negligent Discharge:
  • A shot which travels over a backstop, a berm or in any other direction deemed by the event organizers to be unsafe. (Please note: a competitor who legitimately fires a shot at a target, which hits and then travels in an unsafe direction, through ricochet or bounce will not be disqualified)
  • A shot that strikes the ground less than 10 feet from the competitor, except when shooting at a target that is placed closer than 10 feet from the competitor. The shooter will be stopped. The position that the shooter was in will be marked as well as the impact point. Until a ruling is made, no one shall walk the stage or the area where the violation occurred. Exception: A bullet or shot which strikes the ground within 10 feet of the competitor due to a "hang fire" shall not be subject
  • A shot which occurs while loading, reloading or unloading a firearm after the "Make Ready" command and before the "Range is Clear" command.
  • A shot that occurs while loading, reloading, transitioning off or back to the shoulder or during remedial action in the case of a malfunction or clearing a firearm.
  • A shot that occurs while transferring a firearm between hands.
  • A shot that occurs during movement, except while actually shooting at targets.
  • Exception: A detonation which occurs while unloading a firearm is not considered a shot or discharge and is not subject to DQ. Definition of a Detonation: Ignition of the primer of a round, other than by the action of a firing pin, where the bullet or shot does not pass completely through the barrel. (e.g. when a slide is being manually retracted or when a round is dropped).
  • A competitor shall be disqualified for dropping or losing control of a firearm, whether loaded or unloaded, at any time after the "Make Ready" command and before the "Range is Clear" command is issued. This includes any firearm, loaded or unloaded, that falls after being grounded during the course of fire. Exception: Dropping an unloaded firearm before the "Make Ready" command or after the "Range is Clear" command will not result in disqualification, provided the firearm is retrieved by an Event Official only. If a competitor falls down, and that competitor takes both hands off the long gun, it will be considered a loss of control and is subject to disqualification even if the long gun is retained by a sling.
  • 2.6 Grounding of Firearms DQ Applications:
  • Disqualification Apply to:
  • a) Transitioning from long gun to pistol without engaging the safety.
  • b) Grounding a firearm in the incorrect designated container or stipulated allowable location and the muzzle of the firearm has broken the 180-degree safety plane will result in a match DQ.
  • c) Grounding a firearm in the incorrect designated container or stipulated allowable location and the competitor does move downrange / in front of the firearm, regardless of the condition, will result in a match DQ.
  • Disqualification Does Not Apply to:
  • a) Grounding a firearm in the correct designated container or stipulated allowable location and the safety is not engaged, is not a match DQ.
  • b) Grounding a firearm in an incorrect designated container or stipulated allowable location and the competitor does not move downrange / in front of the firearm, regardless of the safety condition, is not a match DQ. Exemption: Firearm was never touched or handled in the COF; it was left in the original stipulated start location and the competitor did not move downrange / in front of the firearm. There will be no penalty assessed.
  • 2.7 A competitor shall be disqualified for allowing the muzzle of a firearm to break the 180-Degree Safety Plane.
  • Definition of the 180-Degree Safety Plane: The plane defined by an arc both horizontal and vertical that is created when the competitor is standing facing squarely downrange and parallel to, the designated backstop used on the bay to define the 180 safety line on that particular stage. Any muzzle position that points backward toward the mouth of the bay away from the designated 180 safety line is a violation.
  • 2.8 A stage may span two bays during a course of fire, a competitor is allowed to transition between the two bays with a holstered or drawn pistol, loaded carbine or rifle, unless it is specifically forbidden in the COF due to safety concerns. A violation of this action will result in a match DQ.
  • 2.9 A competitor shall be disqualified for unsportsmanlike conduct, which includes, but is not limited to cheating, Intentionally altering targets prior to the target being scored to gain advantage or to avoid penalties, Altering or falsifying score sheets or data in electronic scoring devices, Altering the course of fire. (i.e., moving props and or targets) This includes, but is not limited to, the repositioning or altering of targets, no-shoots, barriers, barrels, walls, tables, grounding containers, fault lines, painted markings, banners, trees, bushes or anything else deemed by match officials to create an unfair advantage.
  • 2.10 Discharging or “Burning” the last round(s) to empty the chamber, unload a firearm or to load a different projectile is admissible, but it must be pointed and done so at a legal target or in a safe direction. Long guns must be fired from the shoulder while “burning” a round if done in a direction other than a legal target for intended firearm being handled. Competitors’ failing to keep long guns shouldered while “burning” any round(s) in a direction other than a legal target is considered a Negligent Discharge and will result in a match DQ.
  • 2.11 Pistol and rifle cartridges must fire a single projectile only. Violators will be deemed as cheating and shall be subject to a match DQ.
  • 2.12 Engaging any steel target with rifle, not designated as a rifle target in the written course description (WCD) is subject to DQ.
  • 2.13 Any competitor found with a magazine inserted in their pistol, carbine, or rifle, while not under the direct supervision of a range official, shall be escorted to a safe area to check the loaded condition. If the magazine or chamber is found to be loaded, the competitor will be subject to a match DQ. Handling loaded magazines, live or dummy rounds or a loaded firearm in a Safe Area will result in a match DQ. Exemption: Closed boxes of ammo may be handled
  • 2.14 A competitor who intentionally loses or displaces eye or ear protection during a course of fire shall be deemed to be cheating and will be subject to a match DQ.
  • 2.15 Threatening or assaulting other competitors or staff personnel, using abusive language or hostile behavior toward a competitor, Range Officer, Range Master, Match Director, Match Staff or Range Venue Staff, will result in a match DQ. Disqualification for this type of conduct shall result in immediate ejection from the match venue property.
  • 2.16 Disruptive behavior from a competitor, in an attempt to disturb or distract other competitors that are shooting a course of fire, will result in a match DQ. Disruptive behavior from a spectator in an attempt to disturb or distract competitors that are shooting a course of fire, shall result in their immediate ejection from the match venue property.
  • 2.17 Competitors must not consume or be under the influence of alcohol or non-prescription drugs at the event site. Violators will be directed to stop shooting, issued a match DQ and must leave the range. However, a competitor found to be impaired and deemed unsafe as a result of legitimate prescription drugs shall only be directed to stop shooting, no DQ. The competitor, at the Match Directors discretion, may be allowed to resume competition, if judged to be fit to return.
  • 2.18 If a competitor is deemed by match staff to be unsafe, due to a medical condition, erratic behavior, an injury that impairs their ability to continue competing safely, or is deemed to be unsafe to themselves or others around them, shall be directed to stop shooting, no DQ. The final decision shall be at the sole discretion of the Match Director.
  • 2.19 Disqualifications will be finalized by the Range Master or the Match Director only.
  • 2.20 Refusal to submit to a rule compliant inspection of any or all equipment that a competitor is using during the match will result in a match DQ.
  • 2.21 Designated containers are utilized to safely ground firearms. They are not considered a stage prop. If a competitor shoots a designated grounding container in the process of abandoning or grounding a firearm or if it already contains a firearm, this action will result in a match DQ. (For the purpose of this rule, the term “shoot” means that a competitor fires any projectile, bullet, pellet or slug, that strikes the container)
  • 2.22 Designated grounding containers, staging tables or any other prop at the starting position or inside the fault lines are not to be used as support for steadying the firearm for a shot.
  • 2.23 Having a holstered pistol with a live round in the chamber while in the prone position will result in a match DQ. This includes prone at the start position or after re-holstering during the course of fire.
  • 2.24 Finger inside the trigger guard: The competitor’s fingers must be visibly outside the trigger guard when moving, loading, reloading or unloading during a course of fire and while clearing a malfunction. Failure to comply with Verbal Warnings will result in a Match DQ. Finger Exceptions: When actually aiming or shooting at targets or while complying with the “Make Ready” command to lower the hammer of a pistol without a de-cocking lever.
  • 2.25 During a course of fire, a competitor "is allowed" to handle more than one firearm at a time, however neither firearm may be discharged until one is either re-holstered or safely grounded or slung. Violation will result in a match DQ.
  • 2.26 All walls, barriers or constructed obstacles are deemed to extend from the ground up to infinity. Shooting under or over or moving under or over such props is strictly forbidden and is considered a safety violation. Unless specifically delineated and allowed in the Written Stage Briefing. Violation will result in a Match DQ.
  • 3.0 CONDUCT
  • 3.1 Competitors and spectators are expected to conduct themselves in a courteous, sportsman-like manner at all times. Clothing with offensive or obscene logos, sayings, pictures or drawings must not be worn or displayed at the event site. Eye protection is mandatory for all competitors, spectators & range personnel at all times while at the event site. Ear protection is mandatory for all participants, spectators & range personnel while on or near a course of fire.
  • 4.0 Classifications, Divisions, Firearms, and Required Equipment
  • 4.1 The class in which a shooter will compete is determined by their equipment, and their firearms. A shooters score after a qualifier will determine what division he or she competes in. Shooters will have the option to complete a course of fire with two firearms, but those firearms selections must consist of one semi-automatic pistol or revolver and one semi-automatic rifle or pistol cartridge firing carbine, defined as Rifle Class and Carbine Class. They may use ironsights, or optics, both having their own class. Sub-Class is determined by the equipment that is used during a course of fire. Equipment may not be changed once a competitor has shot his/her first COF. Sub-Classes may be subject to a “Handicap” time.
  • 4.2 Divisions:
  • Times to be determined
  • (Master)
  • (Expert)
  • (Sharpshooter)
  • (Marksman)
  • (Novice)
  • 4.3 Classifications:
  • Carbine Iron sight Class (CI)
  • Shooters who compete in this class carry both a pistol and semi-automatic pistol cartridge firing long gun, of 9mm or higher. Optics are not permitted in this class.
  • Carbine Optics Class (CO)
  • Shooters who compete in this class carry both a pistol and semi-automatic pistol cartridge firing long gun, of 9mm or higher. Optics are permitted in this class.
  • Rifle Iron Sight Class (RI)
  • Shooters who compete in this class carry both a pistol and semi-automatic centerfire rifle, of .223/5.56x45mm or higher. Optics are not permitted in this class.
  • Rifle Optics Class (RO)
  • Shooters who compete in this class carry both a pistol and semi-automatic centerfire rifle. Optics are permitted in this class.
  • 4.4 Sub-Classes
  • Lightweight (no handicap)
  • Shooter must carry at minimum, enough ammunition to complete the course of fire. All spare magazines and holsters must be worn at waist level, on a drop leg, or in a shoulder sling bag. This sub-class is written as “L” on registration and scorecard.
  • Midweight Combat (-1 second handicap per stage/string)
  • Shooter must carry no less than 2 spare pistol magazines and 4 carbine/rifle magazines loaded to course of fire capacity. Carbine/Rifle magazines must be mounted on a vest or chest rig. Pistol magazines and pistol holster may be mounted on either waist, belt, vest or, chest rig. If the pistol holster is located on a vest or chest rig, the draw angle is not to exceed 15 degrees from the deck. (no horizontal mounted holsters) This sub-class is written as “MC” on registration and scorecard.
  • Heavy Combat (-2 second handicap per stage/string)
  • Shooter must carry an armor load or simulated armor load of 15lbs in a backpack. Weighted packs can be provided to the shooter. Shooter must carry no less than 2 spare pistol magazines and 6 Carbine/Rifle magazines loaded to course of fire capacity. Carbine/Rifle magazines must be mounted on a vest or chest rig. Pistol magazines and pistol holster may be mounted on either waist, belt, vest, or chest rig. If the pistol holster is located on a vest or chest rig, the draw angle is not to exceed 15 degrees from the deck. (no horizontal mounted holsters.) This sub-class is written as “HC” on registration and scorecard.
  • Open Combat (no handicap)
  • Provided that all gear used meets safety standards and is not restricted, shooters in the Open Combat class may carry any assortment of approved gear they choose, and may use any approved firearm they like. Shooters may also use different firearms for different courses of fire, but may not use more than two firearms (one rifle or carbine and one pistol) per course of fire. .22 caliber firearms are approved for this class and this class only. Shooters in the Open Combat class may only be scored at the club level, and at the clubs discretion. Any Open Combat scores received by TSA will not be published or kept on record.
  • 5.0 Firearms, Ammunition, and Equipment
  • FIREARMS
  • 5.1 All firearms used by competitors must be serviceable and safe. Range Officers may demand examination of a competitor's firearm or related equipment at any time to check that they are functioning safely. If a Range Officer declares any such firearm unserviceable or unsafe, it must be withdrawn from the event until the firearm is repaired or replaced to the satisfaction of the Range Master or Match Director or their designee.
  • 5.2 If a competitor's firearm becomes unserviceable during competition, the competitor may replace their firearm with another of the same model, caliber and sighting system, pending approval of the Range Master or Match Director or his designee. In the event that a firearm of the same model, caliber, and sighting system cannot be found, the shooter may use any available firearm, but may also be moved to another division depending on the type of replacement firearm used. All replacement firearms must be approved by the RM/MD or his designee.
  • 5.3 For purposes of this ruling, a "firearm" consists of a specific caliber, receiver, barrel, stock and sighting system combination.
  • 5.4 The same firearm system for each gun, shall be used during the entire event. Forbidden changes include, but are not limited to: change of caliber, barrel length, sighting systems or stock style.
  • 5.5 Restrictions
  • 5.5.1 Ammunition used in rifles may not exceed .30 cal or similar. 50bmg or comparable are not allowed.
  • 5.5.2 An Optic is defined as any lensed sighting device that does not require the use of iron sights, or, “open” sights. All optics are permitted except thermal, night vision devices, and laser pointing devises.
  • 5.5.3 Fully automatic capable firearms are NOT permitted.
  • 5.5.4 Trigger upgrades are allowed however “double fire” triggers or triggers that fire more than one round from the time they are pulled to the time they are reset in the forward position are not permitted.
  • 5.5.5 Bipods, monopods, and tri-pods are not permitted.
  • 5.6 Pistols-
  • A pistol as defined by TSA is any double action revolver, or semi-automatic, magazine fed, pistol cartridge firing weapon that can be secured in a traditional holster. Barrel length may not exceed 6 inches.
  • 5.7 Carbines-
  • A carbine as defined by TSA is any shoulder fired, semi-automatic, magazine fed, pistol cartridge firing weapon. Carbines must have a selectable safety switch. Minimum barrel length is 5 inches not including muzzle device.
  • 5.8 Rifles-
  • A rifle as defined by TSA is any shoulder fired, semi-automatic, magazine fed, centerfire rifle cartridge firing weapon. Rifles must have a selectable safety switch. Minimum barrel length is 10 inches not including muzzle device.
  • 5.9 Ammunition
  • Tracer, incendiary, armor piercing, steel jacketed or steel/tungsten core and steel shot ammunition are specifically not allowed and are prohibited. A competitor found in violation of this shall be assessed a $100 fee for each steel target damaged. Fines will be made payable the day of the offense. Pistol ammunition shall be 9mm or larger(5.7x28mm is ok). Rifle ammunition must be .223 Remington (5.56 x 45 mm NATO) or larger. Pistol and rifle cartridges must fire a single projectile only. Rifle ammunition may not exceed .30 cal or similar.
  • 5.10 Equipment
  • As defined by TSA, “equipment” includes magazine carriers, belts, vests, chest rigs, holsters, slings, weapons accessories, optics, all firearms, magazines, clothing, footwear, and possibly other gear to be defined at the discretion of range officials.
  • All equipment used must be in serviceable condition and will be subject to inspection by range officials. Equipment must not be set up in a manner that interferes with weapons manipulation to the point of creating an unsafe situation. Loose clothing, hanging or loose straps, etc, must be secured before engaging a course of fire.
  • 5.11 Slings
  • All slings must be in serviceable condition and are subject to inspection by range officials. 1, 2, and 3 point slings are acceptable. If a sling is deemed unsafe by a range official, the shooter will be allowed to find a replacement or compete without a sling if possible for that COF.
  • 5.12 Holsters
  • All holsters must be in good serviceable condition and are subject to inspection by range officials. Holsters must retain the firearm by tension, thumb break strap, or button release and all must totally cover the trigger guard. All holsters must possess enough retention to securely hold the firearm when turned upside down. If your holster is deemed unsafe you will have to find an acceptable replacement. For safety reasons, cross draw, inside the waistband, and shoulder holsters are not permitted. Holsters must be mounted at the 3 o’clock or 9 o’clock position or forward of that so as not to violate the 180 degree rule. Drop leg holsters are acceptable provided they do not ride low on the thigh. All thigh holsters must be approved by a range official for ride height and security. Holster may not have more than 15 degrees of “cant”. SERPA holsters are approved for use but are discouraged. Safety officers must meet with any shooters using serpa style holsters to discuss proper engagement of “press button” retention holsters. “Press button” retention holsters are to be swept with the pad of the index finger and not the tip of the index finger. Shooters who violate this rule will be given one warning by the SO. If the violation happens again the shooter will be disqualified and may not continue. If the shooter cannot physically execute the draw in this manner the shooter must use a different style holster. The button may not be disengaged by altering the original design or by using a “block”.
  • 5.13 Belts
  • All belts must be in serviceable condition and must hold the holster tight to the body. All belts are subject to inspection by range officials. Belts may be looped through the pants or externally mounted on the hips “duty belt” or “pistol belt” style provided they are secure.
  • 5.14 Magazine Pouches
  • Magazine pouches can be mounted on the belt, vest or chest rig, or on a drop leg platform, and must be able to securely hold magazines when turned upside down.
  • 5.15 Vests and Chest Rigs
  • All vests and chest rigs must be in serviceable condition and are subject to inspection by range officials. A vest or chest rig as defined by TSA is any platform that mounts over both shoulders, can be secured around the midsection, and allows magazines to be stowed in front of the body. Single strap designs will not be permitted. If a holster is mounted on the chest rig it must be secured properly, and not flap.
  • 6.0 Courses of Fire
  • 6.1 Written Course Description, (WCD)
  • The WCD contains all the information about how a course of fire is to be executed. It also contains any extenuating safety concerns and rules, number of rounds needed, number of magazines needed, number of shots required on each target, the number of shots allowed at each target, and any props that are needed.
  • 6.2 All approved courses of fire for competition will be designed and released by TSA on a monthly basis. Match Directors, Range Masters, and Safety Officers may view courses of fire before a monthly match, but they may not alter or change a COF unless there is a major safety concern and it is approved by a TSA official.
  • The primary courses of fire by which all TSA competitors will use, are designated as “A” courses. “B” courses will be created for facilities that cannot meet normal range requirements set in place by TSA, but still want to participate in TSA events. “A” courses and “B” courses will not be scored together.
  • A normal TSA match will consist of no less than 3 but up to 6 courses of fire. There will be at least one 100yard course, one Skills Test, and one “Close Range” course. “B” courses will likely not have a 100 yard course.
  • Only “A” course scores will be published on TSA’s official website. If a facility has to shoot any number of “B” courses to have at least 3 courses, those “B” course scores will not be published on the website.
  • 7.0 Targets, Steel, and Barriers
  • 7.1 Hostile/Non Threat Targets
  • Scoring will be done using official TSA targets. For a hit on any target to count, the bullet must break the outermost perforated edge. This is to include “Hostile” and “Non Threat” targets.
  • Non-Threat targets must be clearly indicated with the outline of two open hands. A shoot thru of a Non Threat target into a Hostile target will be scored as a hit on a Non Threat and a Hit on a Hostile.
  • 7.2 Modified Targets
  • Paper targets may be modified by painting to simulate a target behind hard cover. If a round breaks the line it will be scored as a hit.
  • 7.3 Steel
  • Calibration of Steel
  • a) The Range Master must designate a specific supply of 9x19mm ammunition and one or more 9mm handguns to be used as official calibration tools by range officials authorized to serve as calibration officers.
  • b) The Range Master must arrange for each popper to be calibrated prior to the commencement of a match, and whenever required during a match.
  • c) For initial calibration, each popper must be set to fall when hit within the calibration zone with a single shot fired from a designated handgun using the calibration ammunition. The shot must be fired from the shooting location, in the course of fire, furthest from the popper being calibrated. The “Calibration Zone” is the circular plate portion of the popper.
  • Calibration Challenges Pistol If, during a course of fire, a popper does not fall when hit, a competitor has these options:
  • a) Shoot the popper again until it falls. In this case, no further action is required and the course of fire is scored “As Shot”.
  • b) The popper is left standing but the competitor does not challenge the calibration. No further action is required and the course of fire is scored “As Shot” with the subject popper scored as a miss.
  • c) The popper is left standing and the competitor challenges the calibration. In this case, the popper and the surrounding area on which it stands must not be touched or interfered with by any person. If a Match Official violates this rule, the competitor will get score/credit for the popper in question, with no penalties assessed. If the competitor or any other person violates this rule, the competitor in question, will not get credit/score and the popper will be scored as a miss and the rest of the course of fire will be "scored as shot”. If the popper falls for any non-interference reason (e.g. wind action) before it can be calibrated, a reshoot must be ordered.
  • d) In the absence of any interference or problem with a target mechanism, a calibration officer must conduct a calibration test of the subject popper, when required, from as near as possible to the point from where the competitor shot the popper. The following will apply:
  • a) If the first shot by the calibration officer hits on or below the calibration zone and the popper falls, the popper is deemed to be properly calibrated and it will be scored as a miss.
  • b) If the first shot fired by the calibration officer hits the popper in the calibration zone and the popper does not fall, the calibration test is deemed to have failed and the competitor will get score/credit for the popper in question with no penalties assessed. The target must now be recalibrated.
  • c) If the first shot fired by the calibration officer hits above the calibration zone, the calibration test is deemed to have failed and the competitor will get score/credit for the popper in question with no penalties assessed. The target must now be recalibrated.
  • d) Designated steel Knock Down style plates are not subject to calibration.
  • e) If a designated steel Knock Down style plate is determined to have been struck and turned sideways or is no longer presenting the face of the target to the competitor at the original location of engagement and does not fall, the competitor will get score/credit for the Knock Down plate in question with no penalty assessed.
  • All steel scoring targets shall be painted and checked for calibration before each squad regardless of weather conditions.
  • All Knock Down (KD) scoring targets shall have a target direction line applied to specify the target presentation angle, verify correct reset for competitors and add a visual aid for the RO to determine if the target was struck for officiating and arbitration purposes.
  • 7.4 Barriers
  • All props, walls, barriers, vision screens and other obstacles are deemed to be impenetrable "hard cover".
  • Walls shall not be shot under or over, unless specifically permitted in the WCD. Firing a shot or shots through a vision barrier to engage a target will result in an additional penalty.
  • 8.0 Scoring and Penalties
  • All scores accumulated from “A” courses will be emailed to TSA and will be published and ranked against all other TSA shooters worldwide on the TSA official website. “B” courses will not be published or ranked beyond the club level. See chapter 6.0 for further info.
  • 8.1 Scoring per stage will be total time + penalties. Total time will determine event finish order. Lowest total time including penalties determines the winner of the event.
  • 8.2 Standard Scoring: Standard scoring stages allow for the use of extra shots no matter how many hits are required on hostile targets. If there are more than the prescribed amount of hits on target, the lowest scored hits will be counted first.
  • 8.3 Limited Scoring- Limited scoring stages only allow a specific amount of rounds to be fired at each target without the use of extra shots. The use of extra rounds will incur a procedural penalty but the lowest scored hits will be counted first.
  • 8.4 Knock Down style plates & poppers must fall to score. Exception: If a knock down style target falls from the stand while being engaged, the competitor will receive score/credit for the target in question with no penalty assessed. (eg.. stand is struck)
  • 8.5 Official TSA Hostile targets are divided into 4 sections, each section counting for different time penalties.
  • -0: no added time
  • -1: Add one second to overall time
  • -3: Add three seconds to overall time
  • X: A shot placed in the inverted triangle located in the head will result in instant target neutralization. Any and all other shots on target, including all misses, will automatically be scored as -0.
  • 8.6 Procedural Penalties- Add 3 seconds per infraction to overall time
  • Procedurals will be assessed if the course of fire is completed other than specified by the course description, cover is used incorrectly, targets are shot out of order, shooting through a vision barrier, shooter does not call out “SAFE ON” before transitioning, or a firearm is reloaded outside of cover.
  • 8.7 Failure to Neutralize (FTN)- Add 5 Seconds to overall time
  • An FTN will be assessed if a Hostile target does not have at least 1 hit in the -0 or -1 area of the target. If a steel target is left standing it is scored as an FTN. FTN’s are not applicable to disappearing targets or limited scoring stages.
  • 8.8 Miss- Add 5 seconds per miss to overall time.
  • If the bullet does not break the outermost perforated line of the target, or if the shooter must make hits in a specified section of the target but fails to do, it will be considered a miss.
  • 8.9 Hit on a Non-Threat- Add 10 seconds per hit to overall time
  • Any shot placement that breaks the outermost perforated line of a NT target will be considered a HNT.
  • 9.0 Range Commands
  • 9.1 Safety Officer (SO) - The person who is in charge of the safety, and proper course execution of your squad. The SO issues the range commands.
  • 9.2 Range Commands- These are phrases used by the Safety Officer of your squad that require a specific action from you, the shooter. A shooters failure to follow range commands could result in penalty or DQ.
  • LOAD AND MAKE READY- Now the shooter may face downrange, and load one or both weapons to course capacity as the Safety Officer dictates.
  • RANGE IS HOT- This will be declared by the SO at the start of the match. At this command, eye and ear protection is now required for all persons on or near an active course of fire.
  • READY- The SO is asking if you are ready to begin the course of fire.
  • STANDBY- The SO is about to sound the start signal. At the sound of the buzzer you may begin to shoot the course of fire.
  • COVER- The SO is warning you that you are not using cover properly and are at risk of receiving a procedural penalty if you do not remedy the problem
  • FINGER- Remove your finger from the trigger. Often heard during movement, during reloading, and unloading. Unless actually firing at targets, your finger should not be on the trigger.
  • SAFETY- SO must observe the shooter putting his/her rifle or carbine on safe before they can transition to a pistol. Shooter must say “SAFE ON” before they transition to pistol. If the SO calls out SAFETY, the SO wants to see that the weapon is on safe.
  • STOP- Stop immediately where you are and remove your finger from the trigger, place the weapon on safe, and orientate the muzzle down. A major safety issue has been identified. The SO will remedy the problem. If you or your gear are the cause of the safety concern, time will not be stopped. Once the safety concern has been remedied, you may complete the course of fire. If you’re stopped for outside circumstances you may be granted a re-shoot at the match director’s discretion.
  • UNLOAD AND SHOW CLEAR- Start with whatever weapon is in your hand first. Remove the magazine, pull the slide or bolt to the rear, eject live ammo and show the empty chamber to the SO will keeping the firearm pointed in a safe direction. Once the SO observes a clear chamber and removed magazine, he will say SLIDE or BOLT. At this command, send the slide or bolt home with safety flag inserted if it’s rifle or carbine. Then the SO will say TRIGGER. Keeping the firearm pointed downrange towards the targets, you will pull the trigger, disengaging the hammer or firing pin and ensuring further you do not leave the firing line with a loaded weapon.
  • RANGE IS SAFE- The SO has determined that the shooter has left the firing line with properly cleared and unloaded firearms and it is now safe to move across the firing line to score and pasty targets.
  • 10.0 Tactical Principles
  • 10.1 Cover
  • When cover is available it must be used to engage targets, unless the shooter is “in the open” then the shooter must be moving. Proper use of cover is achieved when not more than 50% of the shooters upper body is exposed to a single target, and not less than 100% of the shooters legs. Violation will result in a procedural.
  • 10.2 Slicing the Pie
  • This is defined as exposing yourself around cover to one target at a time as they become available. If you can see more than one target at a time from cover, you’re exposed and risk a procedural.
  • 10.3 Tactical Priority
  • Shooting targets in tactical priority means engaging them from nearest hostile target to furthest hostile target. Failure to utilize tactical priority when possible will result in a procedural. Tactical priority will not apply in certain scenarios.
  • 10.4 Reloads
  • TSA will require and define the use of two different methods of reloads depending on the course of fire.
  • 10.4.1 Dry Reload- Dry reloads are conducted upon the firing of the last round in the magazine. The empty magazine does not need to be retained.
  • 10.4.2 Tactical Reload- Tactical reloads are conducted where there is a simulated “lull” in action. With a live round in the chamber, the shooter will swap a magazine of “unknown capacity” for a fresh magazine at full capacity. Any magazine with live rounds in it must be retained by the shooter. If a loaded magazine is left on the ground a Procedural penalty will be assessed per occurrence.
  • 10.5 Transitioning
  • Depending on the scenario, competitors will often transition between long gun and pistol. A transition is required when a competitors long gun (primary weapon) runs dry or malfunctions in the open, or as required by the course of fire, and the shooter must switch to his/her pistol (secondary weapon). Before a transition can happen, the competitor must say “SAFE ON”. If a transition is made without calling “SAFE ON” but the safety was engaged, then a procedural may be assessed. In either case, if the safety is not activated before transitioning, the competitor may be disqualified.
  • 10.6 Tactical Sequence
  • Tactical sequence is the action of engaging multiple targets with one round each and then engaging with another round each in reverse order once all targets have been engaged.
  • 11.0 Stage Execution
  • At start signal, beginning at Position 1 (P1) the shooter will engage targets as prescribed by the written course description). Targets in the WCD will be numbered (T1, T2, etc.) Targets may either be shot from cover or in the open. Targets shot in the open, must be shot while moving. If your primary weapon runs empty while or malfunctions while in the open, the shooter must transition to his secondary firearm. Reloads and remedial actions may only be done while totally behind cover. Before a shooter can transition from a rifle or carbine to a pistol, the shooter MUST say “SAFE ON”. Pistols must be holstered before handling a rifle or carbine, or rifle or carbine magazines. Once all targets have been engaged per the course instructions, the SO will ask if the shooter is done, and to unload and show clear. Once the shooter has been cleared off the line by the SO, the range will be declared safe.
  • Written and Authored by: Walt Enneking at IronSight Tactical LLC

No Upcoming Events Scheduled